COIN PHRASES

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May
07

Is all writing copy writing?

I would argue (today) that all writing is copy writing. Including journalism, reviews and other forms, because it is essentially promoting the worthiness of its own subject e.g. promoting the experience of listening to music, in the case of an album review.

In that sense, it’s like philosophy. It argues for its own existence.

.. Except philosophical arguments can undermine their own existence. It’s the only academic subject that can, and does.

Okay, so I would say philosophical writing isn’t copy writing.

As for art – novels, plays, poetry. That’s the most self-promotional writing of all, isn’t it? Because all writers are egotistical and are arguing for a legacy. Art promotes a feeling in you, copy writing promotes a feeling for you to put money to. Copy writing, therefore, is an extension of art. So all writing would therefore be copy writing.

 

 

 May 7th, 2016  
 aleekwrites  
 Writing  
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 0 Comment
Apr
28

Innovative new hire – me!

The case for innovation – A.K.A: Hire me! (- I’m new!)

I’m a unique blend of jobs, industries and career choices, all with the central passion for writing well-researched, creative and intelligent pieces. I think that’s just the kind of innovation you’re looking for!

Sectors worked in (I’ll steal ideas from):

  • Animals
  • Crime
  • English Literature (BA)
  • Ethical business and policies
  • Finance and banking
  • Literary culture and art
  • Multimedia Journalism (NCTJ)
  • Packaging and design
  • Philosophy (BA)
  • Science and the environment
  • Toys and games
  • Travel health

Roles taken on (I’ll bring skills from):

  • Administration
  • Arts graduate
  • Barista (not a very good one…)
  • Blogger
  • Customer Service
  • Event organisation
  • Hunter (for the right job!)
  • Journalism/reporting
  • Marketing
  • Poet, performer, playwright
  • Researcher
  • Sales

How I will benefit you (you will get):

  • The competitive edge of a wider range of ideas, opinions and expertise
  • An already well-respected online presence, so I’ll add to your digital brand
  • Relationship building – I already know or follow a lot of creative and small businesses
  • Fantastic value; I’d be dedicated, creative and impassioned about the role
  • Global outlook: I’ve lived in New Zealand, and love some other countries too!

This was prepared for a job interview – the company dealt with innovations across the world. (I’m open to new job interviews, right now!)

My email is aleekwrites@gmail.com

Apr
07

5 intelligent ways to think about Snapchat

  1. Friends. I keep in touch with friends literally on the other side of the world. We know Snapchat highlights the transitory nature of friendship, but it enhances it and it makes me laugh more than other social media channels. It’s a snippet of daily life that it’s hard to get elsewhere – Facebook’s photo albums feel more static in comparison. It’s the 140 character equivalent in video and photos. You can’t go in depth – and yet it doesn’t feel superficial, seeing the most random spontaneous details of peoples’ lives and appreciating my own. Life is in the small things.
  2. Love. What did you do for Valentine’s Day this year? Did you make it onto Mashable’s top Valentine’s Snaps? Roses and chocolates are so out dated. And if you don’t use it for your own love, follow celebrities’ relationships on Snapchat. It’s funny and cute and mistakes easily happen, like to that Bachelorette couple. Snaps should be hilarious and it’s a more private public show of affection and those little moments in a relationship that you want the world to see. It used to be Facebook, to show off how lucky you are with the hot new boyfriend/girlfriend who’s treating you to a night out, but it just doesn’t cut it anymore. In fact, I think it’s cooler not to put your relationship status on Facebook anymore. Maintain that mystique, outside of those precious few seconds Snapped.
  3. News. Of course, news outlets need to be on Snapchat. They can curate several perspectives of the same event such as a protest, and they can crowd source what’s happening on the ground by reaching people connected to GPS on their phone. Of course “after dropping the paywall, The Sun goes looking for audiences where they are – and that includes Snapchat”. And this is the news you want, you get to see the news through the eyes of people you follow, and it’s more akin to real eyes than other social media channels. This is the best news curation app since… you could write letters to newspapers. It works particularly well for arts, culture and fashion: see Harper’s Bazaar‘s directory.
  4. Webinars. Wait, hear me out. Digital Marketing Magazine says they’re the future of digital marketing and with ON24 one webinar can be used in so many different ways. If you can split webinars into several parts, put them on Snapchat. and forward them between friends, it’d be so cool. And think about it, the registration to webinars operates on the basis you will miss out if you don’t get there for the specified – that’s almost exactly how Snapchat operates.
  5. Philosophy. Snapchat has got into my mind. The brevity of Snapchat – just like Twitter, and Vine – is the appeal. It’s the shortness of life. The transitory nature of Snapchat has a dark Freudian death drive about it. And the Snap snips are so real and the crude sketches you can impose are so basic (remember Paint?) that it has a childlike innocence about it. So if Millenials are a product of their environment, technology and culture – like all people – then what does Snapchat say about us? It may well be the better way to communicate. And, when a Snap disappears, where does it go? Where should it go?! When you accidentally open it and close it, you can’t get it back – like in real life. And I mean, that’s unacceptable for social media…
  6. Philosophy could learn a lot from what’s popular:

 

 

 April 7th, 2016  
 aleekwrites  
 Social Media  
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 0 Comment
Feb
14

Poem: Dealbreaker

I’ve never published anything lovey before. Can you tell?
(This is for a competition. So don’t judge. But judge.)

DEAL BREAKER

It was all wrong;

His politics, his taste in music and art.
He didn’t believe in chakras, he didn’t like champagne.
His jumpers, his horse before the cart.
He drove the wrong car, he didn’t like the rain.

“It’s over,” she said. “You go against all my principles.”

Him: “… Oh.”

He sipped his hot chocolate.
Her’s was a smoothie.

“So…Which one was the deal breaker?”

Her: “My principle to never fall in love.”

 February 14th, 2016  
 aleekwrites  
 Poetry  
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 0 Comment
Sep
17

The man with the yellow violin

I miss the man with the yellow violin.

His high notes raised my commuter spirits every morning when it was needed. I was low, and he was an inspiration.

Violins usually play on mourning or sadness. They indulge the sympathy of sad story told by real life. The sound touches the soul of compassion.

But this yellow violin was destined for King’s Cross cross-ways amid commuter rush. The music and his enthusiasm and the spark was there to soothe and delight. That moment to stop and hear and reflect the morning commute. The wondering why I am here at this time in my life. The potential of it all, the parallel worlds alongside my daily grind. I am here to listen and my particular train is in vain because I know it wasn’t meant to be. Where it was taking me was the source of my despair. The beautiful soaring sequences were familiar and timely. They melted my heart in broken realisation of the route I was taking that morning.

The mourning yellow violin was special and bright, and my morning was special and bright to me. The blues had thawed the melancholy and the yellow lion spirit had brought the light.
I wondered if he enjoyed his job. I didn’t have to wonder. It was obvious. I mean, I projected. I wondered if I enjoyed mine. But, I enjoyed the commute, and I miss it now. I miss the man with the yellow violin.

 

 September 17th, 2015  
 aleekwrites  
 Artistry, Observation  
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Sep
07

One Day by David Nicholls; amazing

Seriously. One Day by David Nicholls got to me. one_day_big
I’ve cried, smiled, felt my heart burst, romantically despaired, love-hated London and questioned the point of my own 26-27 years (especially when I got to that point). It described everything with the bittersweet aptness and post-party despair of free-falling after University. That freedom tainted by that sobering realisation of how much you rely on, and need to face, the very things and people and insecurities you left behind. Far behind, in some cases. But you’re back, and life goes on at an abrupt, galloping, yearly pace, and the book catapults through the snapshot dilemmas of growing up.
 
The runaway stream of words about the finest, direst details caught in my throat, often. It’s a mirror; an affirmation for any confused 20-something reader that we’re not alone. You are certainly not. The two graduates couldn’t be more different, although they cross into different stages at mismatched points and it’s an uplifting tragedy; a contradiction in terms. I was angry at the author for doing this to them. Doing what? Pounding their souls with the gritty realities of life out of control. The unexpected twists and turns that no one can foresee despite the fact we are told stories about them all the time. 
 
And as the book develops, rapidly, their lives speed up, and the author speeds up, and there’s a moment in reading wide-eyed that I wondered if this was rushed. Whether the author deliberately sped up to convey a sense of life reeling out of control – or, just to make the point. That time, and books, run out.
 
While reading this rather life-defining book I started writing emails in the style of Emma, as if I had suddenly found (identified with) that voice. 
 
And there’s the classic writerly point made alongside the protagonist’s journey through book publishing that writing is good and worth pursuing and works out in the long run, even if just to make you a better and more compassionate person with the relationships that make you grow, regardless of material and literary success. Except, she is also self-deprecating and insecure and finds herself adrift with disappointingly superficial characters in The Arts – and you can’t help wonder if Dexter is like that, and you just want to shake Emma and show her that she is refreshing and sweet and honest and you need her to know her solid intelligent mind soars through these pages. And Dexter… oh, Dexter. You can understand, truly, that people who are lucky, successful and incredibly good looking are, well, in pain. 
 
Places and paths are revisited and retrod with such honest flaws, such sincerity, and such intelligence. We all feel these things. But especially after University and some definition that graduates are supposed to be successful and they find themselves falling just as much as anyone else, until we learn, somehow, messily, to do some things better and all of a sudden our age changes things and we want different things and how is life ever going to work out, for real? The answer provided is realistic; it works out but only in ways we don’t expect. And these ways can delight us, if we have the courage to change absolutely everything when we just can’t take it any more.
 
And, perhaps, live a little more.
I cried. Many times. (And if you know why, don’t spoil it for everyone else.)

 

 September 7th, 2014  
 aleekwrites  
 Books  
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 0 Comment
Jul
14

Facebook statuses, I write.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/842545

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/842545

‘I’m bored of writing,’ I write, into the accusatorily blinking Facebook status box. I drop the words into it’s post-box slot and release them into the abyss. I semi-pretentiously wonder what to write next, as if Facebook matters, as if it matters if I have quality thought out here.
No. Every day it more and more resembles a lost-and-found prison, painted in clinical blue, where some passers-by with hangovers typing in their memories and contacts from the party the night before. People sometimes lose themselves in here.
Even we, the cute ‘Facebook generation’, see the low-level fun of self-aggrandising, self-deprecating statuses is diminishing. There’s nothing to prove any more. Relationships move on, people forget, people don’t care, or if they do, it’s weird; we get it now. There is a time and a place for passive-aggressive messages. Was it ever Facebook statuses? Perhaps it was always post-its on the fridge.
Sponsored posts and company pages become the realm of the employable social media writers. The nostalgic innocence of idealistic University students indulging in vanity is swept away. I mean, grow up. We’re adults now.
The only people who give their statuses any (unpaid) thought any more are, like, professionally branded ‘writers’, or… people who don’t know much about Facebook, really.
Amirite?
 July 14th, 2014  
 aleekwrites  
 Creativity, Social Media  
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 0 Comment
Jul
07

B0ring Tweets vs Ricky Gervais; my appreciation, your treat.

Adapted conversation from when I introduced funny guy The Bunnybeater to… @b0ringTweets Versus @RickyGervais

Here’s Episode 6. It’s a particularly good one. Episode 7 was a bit of a let down after that, to be honest.

B: “I don’t understand.”

A: “You don’t understand?”

B: “I…I’m starting to be entertained by them, but I’m not sure why. But, not hugely entertained. Just a little.
“It’s odd. Perplexing. It’s like a joke I can almost grasp, but not quite.”

A: “Exactly! … When you actually laugh, that’s when you’re in trouble.”

B: “…You’ve actually laughed?”

A: “Right. So. If you read Boring Tweets you’ll see how its funny Gervais is trying to push his limits. Like a test of will. He caaaan’t keep up boringness. And Boring Tweets takes his time, it’s tense… Its like. That can’t possibly be manouevred to be more boring. But he trumps Gervais every time! The Olympics of being boring, as it were… And humour is basically playing with expectations, after all?
…Not that im really into it and thought about it much or anything.” *whistles*

*serious silence*

A: “It’s just so unfunny its funny, okay!”

B: “Oh you’re so very English.”

A: “How’s that very English?”

B: “The ‘so unfunny it’s funny’, the actively trying to find humour in being deliberately mundane. It’s a very specifically English trait.”

A: “Well… it is! I suppose Gervais captured that awkward social small talk unbearability in The Office. I love it because, well, it’s… kinda soothing. Reassuring. The mundane. Yet also so irritating. And that tension is the funny. You want it, but you don’t. You realise what a waste of time this is. You feel – really feel – the futility of life, spent in these boring (but not bored) moments watching the trusty monotonous photocopier machine repeat in The Office’s cuts or the pregnant pause for thought as Boring Tweets is warming up to say something utterly, resignedly, but addictively and hypnotically, pointless.
Isn’t this the very tragi-comedy of life itself?!”

LOOK. I’M DEEP.

A: “You know what else is pointless?
.. A blog post on this conversation! Yes! I love pointless blogging! It’s reassuring!”

*30 secs later*

Afterthought: Ya know, it’s not just the genuine believability of boring tweets, it’s the consistent cadence and right rhythm perfect for Twitter. I did linguistics of dramatic script at University for one semester and that paper would have had a field day on this.

Jun
28

The Book Club, Shoreditch

I felt like I was in a hipster film set.

Not a set up film set, I mean, in a documentary about hipsters? … as in, it was so real, it felt fake?

Just, space, wooden floors, with good looking creative types wearing cardigans and thick-rimmed glasses using their iDevices or playing ping pong (which is cool). Colours were all pretentiously pastel and everything was too polished, and lean… even down to the variety of beers, with a beer menu of about 12 beers that were in large font across an A4 piece of paper on a clipboard, with a similar wine list, and cocktail menu with an intriguing ‘Shoreditch twat’.

Still, it was nice. Fun. Cute. Cool… for a summer’s day.
Maybe I should write a blog post about it, I thought to myself.

But the problem with hating on hipster venues is that they *aim* for pretentious, so it’s just a low blow to say it’s *too* trendy, either it sounds ironic (and falls into their trap) or… I sound bitter (which falls into their trap).

 June 28th, 2014  
 aleekwrites  
 Drink  
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 0 Comment
Jun
21

I’m a pointless writer. (Poem)

I’m a thoughtful, flighty writer

A philosophical dream

Cynically idealistic, honestly fictional,

I’m so full of fancy bullshit, and inspired by the same.

I make apt observations of contradictory truths and beautiful paradoxes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m fun and I’m game; (I’m nonsensical and competitive).

I’m stupid with intelligence enough

To know what’s wrong with everything I’m doing…

and I probably know what you think of it, too.

I’m egotistical and sensitive,

silly and sweet,

sincerely trivial.

I like trying new things

Like word salads

and world literature

and whiskies.

I dance with my words like similes (they are notoriously bad dancers).

I’m humbly pretentious,

self-consciously brave,

and here’s a pointless poem;

the best kind of rave.

 June 21st, 2014  
 aleekwrites  
 Poetry  
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 0 Comment